Caitlyn Caughell

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Click here to download résumé.

Caitlyn Caughell_Resume

What people are saying:

“As with any bildungsroman, Violet’s emotional growth– and emotional healing from years of grief– provide the meat for the songs, making this a very rich but very challenging role for any singer/actress. Without makeup or prosthetics, the performer must make Violet’s ugliness visual in her words and deeds, and must make her growth– her enlightenment– believable and sympathetic. Happily, young Caitlyn Caughell accomplishes all of this, capturing Violet’s wit, rage, inner ugliness and inner beauty all at once in a truly remarkable performance. When belting, her voice sits firmly in the mask, resonating power. When singing soprano, the voice becomes light and delicate, suggesting a weakness hiding under the strength of the belt. While it should come as no surprise that Ms. Caughell is a terrific singer– after all, this is the program in vocal performance– the depths that she finds as an actress are quite impressive. She deserves to have a long and successful stage career.”

— BroadwayWorld.com

“In the title role, senior Caitlyn Caughell turns in a stunning performance. An Oklahoma native, she expertly slips into Violet’s country drawl and, despite the fact the scar is invisible to the audience’s eye, Ms Caughell makes you feel the pain of a scar that runs miles deep. The real treat, however, is when she sings and her voice fills the room. Whether sassy, robust or sweet, Ms. Caughell navigates each song with great skill and a big heart, particularly when she implores her father to look at her disfigured face in the aptly-titled ‘Look At Me’”.

— Harvest Home Blog

“…He was matched vocally and with sass by Caitlyn Caughell’s Laurey, as a lovely little tomboy who happily matches Curley’s bravado with spine and verve. Caughell did well making Laurey less flaky and more genuinely confused by the intentions of the men around her, and too stubborn to confront anyone before a chaos of courting (with potentially dangerous results) swirls around her.”

— The Hudson Valley News